Hope Sandoval

List: Best Female Rock Singers

Here is a list of the best female singers in rock music…in no particular order. I’m sure I missed some so add them in the comments!

1. Shirley Manson- Garbage
2. Joan Jett
3. Lita Ford
4. Janis Joplin
5. Aimee Echo- Human Waste Project/The Start
6. Courtney Love- Hole
7. Grace Slick- Jefferson Airplane
8. Stevie Nicks- Fleetwood Mac
9. Brody Dalle- The Distillers
10. Hope Sandoval- Mazzy Star
11. Delila Paz- The Last Internationale
12. Kim Gordon- Sonic Youth
13. Cristina Scabbia- Lacuna Coil
14. Amber Webber- Black Mountain/Lightning Dust
15. Arden Fisher- Dekades
16. Meg Myers
17. Fiona Apple
18. Ann Wilson- Heart
19. Wendy O Williams- Plasmatics
20. Patti Smith
21. Karen O- Yeah Yeah Yeahs
22. Alanis Morrisette
23. Skin – Skunk Anansie
24. Chrissie Hynde- The Pretenders
25. Emily Armstrong- Dead Sara
26. Alison Mosshart- The Kills

Amazing Must Own Albums: Mazzy Star- So Tonight That I Might See

 

418453540128

21 years ago, Mazzy Star released their second album So Tonight That I Might See. This album has stuck with me since I first heard “Fade Into You.” This genre bending took elements of alternative, pop, and a little bit of psychedelia and made a sensual, deep and beautiful album. Hope Sandoval’s unique and soft voice really sets the tone throughout. Dave Roback’s production and musical arrangements mix in plenty of variety among its tracks without losing sight of what made the group so special to begin with. There is also something very hypnotic about this album. Hope’s vocals across the haze  on Bells Ring is seductive, her voice is a breath of melody. Mary of Silence slows the album down to a near halt, with each thump and beat  fading into the ether. Five String Serenade,” (a cover song from the band Love) is one of the albums finest moments. This version is simple, delicate and minimal in nature. Wasted, ripe with distortion, bluesy riff, is the heaviest song of the album’s ten compositions. Album closer, So Tonight That I Might See,” introduces Native American inspired tribal percussion and the intermittent tambourine crash, covered over with a spoken-word vocal, executed with the signature subtle enthusiasm demonstrated throughout the record. So Tonight That I Might See never tries to be something it’s not. This album is devastating as it is touching and has stood the test of time since it’s release in 1993. This is definitely an album that should be in any music fans collection.

 

By: Brian Lacy