The Score

The Score: Fight Club by The Dust Brothers

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It’s been over 20 years now since the release of Fight Club. Interestingly enough, that film and the book, are even more relevant now that ever. If you really examine the themes of it, you’d be pretty astonished by what the overall message is. Granted that’s if you’ve never really delved into both of them. One of my favorite things about the film has always been the music though. What The Dust Brothers created not only was perfect for it but, it also set a tone for a lot of other composers to follow as a template. Throughout the film, The Dust Brothers were able to tap into many different sounds to really encapsulate the vibe of the scene. The intensity of the performances mixed with the music created a very amazing tension that played off each other so well that, when you listen to the score on its own, you start to feel like you might have tapped into Jack’s inner dialogue. Interestingly, director David Fincher originally wanted Radiohead to create the music for the film but, Thom Yorke declined, as he was worn out from all the promotion of OK Computer.

 
The Dust Brothers Fight Club Score:

The Score: The Crow by Graeme Revell

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This new topic is all about the scores that go along with films.

Since this is a new topic, I thought I’d start with my all time favorite score soundtrack. Yes, it’s for The Crow. I absolutely love this score. It really is perfect and compliments this film beautifully. Consisting of mostly orchestral music, with some electronic and guitar elements, Graeme Revell created a soundscape that is lush and full of darkness. This score also has a way of giving you chills as you watch the film and you hear the score accompany the scenes. There’s an iconic scene in which Eric Draven is on the roof performing a guitar solo (entitled “Inferno”) that is not only iconic and wonderfully shot but, it’s also worth noting that Brandon Lee, learned to play guitar for his role in the film. Although since he died before filming this scene, a body double was used.

This score is truly one of the greats. It covers every emotion and feeling. The way the film is and how this score and the soundtrack are put together is stunning. There aren’t enough scores/soundtracks that can really hit it out of the park like this one did.
The Crow Score by Graeme Revell: