Month: March 2017

Live Review: Oathbreaker at The Roxy

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Do you remember that feeling you get when you hear and see a band that leaves you utterly in awe? I’m still in a daze from seeing Oathbreaker last night. I’ve been looking forward to seeing them live since I first heard their masterpiece Rheia, and they were every bit of what I expected and more. Seeing Oathbreaker live is poetry in motion. The true essence of artistry and personal connection seethes through every note played and sung/screamed. The purity of how the music and words come through live is beautiful. This show and band is a perfect example of how to leave a lasting mark.

Kicking off the night was Jaye Jayle. Conceived by Evan Patterson of Young Widows, this group set the night off with a stark mood that was drenched in blues and dreary vibes all the while creating a sense of calm before the storm. I’ll admit when I checked them out before seeing them live I wasn’t sure what to expect but, as they played through their set, I became more and more engrossed in what they were doing. Mixing blues with bits of folk and southern gospel, Jaye Jayle is quite the sight to see live. As good as they sound on their album, seeing them live really makes it stand out.

Direct support came from Khemmis. Their doom metal meets 70’s rock vibe was a wise choice for the evening. Dueling guitar solos and tight rhythms bellowed through the Roxy as Khemmis played through a chunk of songs from their highly touted new album Hunted. At times during their set I kept thinking that Khemmis is what Rush would sound like if they were metal and didn’t have the synths. With that in mind, Khemmis delivered an epic set that left the audience lining up by their merch spot after they played.

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The main event of the evening though was Oathbreaker. To say that I’m totally enthralled by this band is an understatement. There is really something special about Oathbreaker. I haven’t been this excited by a new band in a long time. From the moment they started their set with “10:56/Second Son of R,” it was on. Unrelenting and beyond powerful, Caro Tanghe, Gilles Demolder, Lennart Bossu, and Wim Coppers delivered one of the most sonically menacing yet crisp sets I’ve seen in a long time. Other songs like “Being Able To Feel Nothing,” “Immortals,” “Needles In Your Skin,” “Where I Live,” and Where I Leave” each left their own mark. As I mentioned in the beginning of this review, Oathbreaker live is poetry in motion. Instead of the crowd stirring up a pit, everyone in attendance was fully engrossed in what the band was doing on stage. The translation from record to live is seamless and smooth and I’d even go as far as saying that their live sound is even more astounding than their album. Each song played seemed to really conjure up the sense of passion and belief from their band as they delivered their soul to you.

Seeing a band like Oathbreaker is a great reminder that music is art. And when you truly believe in what you are doing, the chances of making something substantial and great is even higher. My faith in music is alive and well because of Oathbreaker. I haven’t left a show in a while feeling this good and inspired. I truly hope that people recognize all the talent and art that Oathbreaker has to offer. They deserve to be held in the highest regards. Go check them out if they are in your area. You won’t be disappointed in the least.

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Review By: Brian Lacy

Photos By: Cam Smith https://camsmithphoto.com

Top Ten Bands A-Z: P

10697292_723168117777156_4168158518538488340_o.pngThe A to Z  list continues to find the top ten bands/artists in the alphabet. P is upon us and needs help to complete the list. As usual your suggestions are wanted in completing this list. These are in no particular order as well.

 

01) Portishead
02) Pearl Jam
03) Perfect Circle, A
04) Pink Floyd
05) Placebo
06) Pantera
07) Pixies, The
08) Iggy Pop
09)
10)

Song Battle: Into The Void: Black Sabbath vs Nine Inch Nails

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This is only the second time I’ve done this feature and I’m really enjoying it. The first one (Creep: Radiohead vs Stone Temple Pilots) was a sort of softball way to begin this but, now we start to really get into the thick of it.
Next up is Black Sabbath vs Nine Inch Nails and their songs “Into The Void.” Both are excellent songs and add so much to their respective albums (Master Of Reality and The Fragile).

Personally I would pick Nine Inch Nails to win. I just have a deeper connection to them than I do Black Sabbath.

Who wrote the better “Into The Void?”

 

Black Sabbath- Into The Void:

 

Nine Inch Nails- Into The Void:

Must Own Albums: Oathbreaker- Rheia

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2016 was a tremendous year for great albums. I’ve mentioned it in previous posts and I stick to my thought, I honestly think that in about 10 years 2016 is going to be a very highly regarded year for music just as, 1994 was (not as poignant obviously). There is one album that I really want to point out as amazing, inspiring, emotional, and most importantly a masterpiece. I’m talking about Oathbreaker‘s album RHEIA. Since I first heard this album I can’t turn it off. It’s on constant repeat. Everything from the music, its depth, production, tones,  depth, artwork, lyrics,  and performances, especially that of singer/lyricist Caro Tanghe are incredible. I love the whole thing keep finding new things about the album that make me love it even more.

Every song on the album leaves you breathless. Rheia is more than just a masterpiece, it’s a genre defining album, that will inspire a slew of new bands. Taking black metal and mixing it with shoegaze (on a side note, I’ve always hated that term), Oathbreaker takes it further by their added sense of post hardcore, ambience, and acoustic sensibilities. This band emits a sense of honesty and ferocious tenacity that I haven’t heard in many years. Each members every emotion is worn on their sleeves as they deliver performances that will send chills up your spine.

I would go song by song but, I really want you all to hear this album from start to finish, and then we can talk. You have to listen to it. Rheia is an album that has the depth musically and lyrically that makes you remember why music is so powerful. I believe that music saves lives, and this album is one of those. Not only that but, when you listen, you feel it all too. The lyrics are beautifully poetic, dark, and intense. They are also some of the most personal and heartfelt words I’ve heard in a very long time. Caro Tanghe is a revelation as a writer and vocalist. The music is stunningly charasmatic along with heavy and pummeling. The beats of drummer Wim Coppers (and Ivo Debrabandere) help to really accentuate your heartstrings as Caro sings and screams, all the while guitarists (and bassists) Lennart Bossu and Gilles Demolder come at you with an attack of devastation and new life, through the use of their instruments.

Rheia is the true ALBUM OF THE YEAR for 2016. Transcending genres as well as setting the bar for their peers is remarkable. While this may not be for everyone, give this an honest shot. Read the words, and wrap yourselves up in what a masterpiece this album is. I thank you for listening and taking the time to do something for the love of great music that needs to be heard.

I present to you, Oathbreaker’s Rheia:

 

 

Or streaming on YouTube:

 

 

The Videos:

10:56/Second Son of R:

 

Immortals:

 

The Audiotree Session:

 

TOUR DATES:

 

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That Was A Bad Idea: Audioslave Playing Rage Songs

 

 

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This new feature is another fun one. I get to show you all things that just were really bad ideas. There are so many bad ideas in music, and I feel compelled to share them with you all and get your opinions.

For the first bad idea let us start with Audioslave deciding to play Rage Against The Machine songs as well as Soundgarden songs (but those aren’t as bad as the RAGE part). This was a bad idea. The idea of Audioslave is a good idea, but this was atrocious. First off different vocalist with a completely different range and personality. Chris Cornell for all the great vocal performances, really doesn’t do this song or any of the Rage songs they played justice. It seems forced and uninspired. Audioslave played “Killin In The Name Of,” “Sleep Now In The Fire,” and “Bulls on Parade.” each one was worse than the other. I sadly witnessed this live when Audioslave started touring on their second album, the very underwhelming Out Of Exile. Note that when they first came out the didn’t play any of their previous bands songs. The Soundgarden songs fall short as well. You could tell that Chris, was over those songs and wanted to move on from that part of his life. Tom Morello, Tim Commerford, and Brad Wilk are great at their instruments but the way they played the Soundgarden songs, it just didn’t feel right. Their unique styles just don’t convey the songs the way the original players did.

I really want to know who suggested the band play their old bands songs. Was this a management or record label decision? Who ever thought of this is an idiot. The only ever time an idea like this worked, and I mean the ONLY TIME, is when Joe Walsh became a member of the Eagles, and they would perform Rocky Mountain Way.

Anyways, here are Audioslave’s performances of them performing Rage Against The Machine and Soundgarden songs. Don’t say I didn’t warn you!

 

Killin In The Name:

 

Bulls On Parade & Sleep Now In The Fire:

 

Spoonman:

 

Outshined:

 

Songs In Film: Lynyrd Skynyrd- Free Bird in The Devil’s Rejects

 

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The new topics continue today! Songs in film is going to be a fun one for sure. I’m a sucker for great song placement in a film. When that right song hits as the scene plays out, (you know the feeling) it all makes it that much more poignant.

The first one I present to you is Lynyrd Skynyrd’s classic “Free Bird,” which you hear playing at the end in Rob Zombie’s The Devil’s Rejects.  This is the ABSOLUTE BEST place this song has ever been heard in a film. It’s such an iconic song that the way the climax of the song hits when the bullets are flying… OH MY! Anytime I hear “Free Bird” played anywhere, I can’t help but always think of this scene.

Let me know what you think!!

Lynyrd Skynyrd- Free Bird in The Devil’s Rejects:

 

Solo Album Spotlight: Jerry Cantrell- Degradation Trip

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Ever since I started Audioeclectica, I’ve constantly been thinking of different topic ideas to add to the fun. One that I’ve been thinking about a lot as of late is a spotlight on solo albums. There are so many out there and certain ones really deserve to be given their proper due. Solo albums are tricky to pull off. A lot of the time the solo album tends to fall flat or sound too similar to the artists main band.

Back in 2002 following the passing of Layne Staley, Jerry Cantrell was readying a new solo album. The album was recorded before Layne had passed but, was dedicated to him when the album was released two months later. The album I’m speaking of is Degradation Trip. This opus is truly a remarkable album. The story behind it is pretty interesting too.  To quote Jerry, “In ’98, I locked myself in my house, went out of my mind, and wrote 25 songs. I rarely bathed during that period of writing; I sent out for food; I didn’t really venture out of my house in three or four months. It was a hell of an experience.” Something else that makes Degradation Trip a stand out solo album is Jerry using a different backing band, enlisting the help  Mike Bordin (Faith No More, ex- Ozzy Osbourne) on drums and Robert Trujillo (Metallica, ex- Ozzy Osbourne. Another intriguing tidbit about this album is that while making it, Jerry would be left without a label and a slew of studio bills. Jerry would go on to mortgage his home to continue on making this record. Upon completion, Jerry would sign a new deal with Roadrunner Records. After the signing, the label had asked for the album to be condensed from 25 songs to 14, but promised it would release the other songs at some point. Which explains why there are two different versions of Degradation Trip.

Jerry Cantrell is one hell of a songwriter and on this album he really carves his own niche. While the material on this album has many similarities to Alice In Chains, there is a purity to it that makes this a memorable and artistic triumph. Songs like “Psychotic Break,” “Owned,” “Angel Eyes,” “Solitude,” “Hellbound,” “Gone,” “Castaway,” She Was My Girl,” “Anger Rising” and “Thanks Anyway” are among my favorites on the album. The guitar work on all throughout the album is masterful. Not only are Jerry’s riff skills impressive, his use of melody is what really separates him from the pack. Always one to write deep and introspective words, Jerry doesn’t stray from that on this album. In fact I find these songs to be some of the most poetic songs he’s written since Dirt.

Jerry Cantrell really comes through on delivering a true solo album. This album deserves to be regarded and given the proper accolades it deserves. It’s not easy to go out on your own especially when you are part of something as special as Alice In Chains but, Jerry did it with grace and artistry. Check out Degradation Trip and let the music consume you.

 

Jerry Cantrell- Degradation Trip Volumes I & II:

 

Anger Rising Video: